Not everyone was shocked by the price however, with one person, seemingly referring to the cost of living crisis, writing: ‘Cheese, where I live, in Asda is about £2.50/2.70. The price has gone up quite a bit.’

The broadcaster recorded a peak television audience of 7.6 million, during coverage on BBC One last night and there were also 1.5 million streams across BBC iPlayer and the BBC Sport website and app for the game.

In all, 9.1 million people enjoyed – or suffered – a tense encounter, with England falling behind to Esther Gonzalez’s opener, top 10 before levelling in the 84th minute through Ella Toone and then Georgia Stanway scoring the winner in extra time with a stunning strike.

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‘Everyone is taking the p**s at the moment and I don’t know why because all the queues have disappeared from the chippy,’ the wrote. ‘Pubs and restaurants are pretty empty, everyone has cut back because of high prices, so they lose out even more in the end!’

‘The principle is if someone is wanting to get out, we don’t want ‘do you lose your job or are you going to lose money?’ to be on the list of difficulties that that individual is facing,’ he told ABC radio.

Google, Microsoft, Meta and Amazon launched a public effort Monday to scrap the leap second, an occasional extra tick that keeps clocks in sync with the Earth’s actual rotation. US and French timekeeping authorities concur.

Researchers said that in the best-case scenario – where all drinkers return to their 2019 levels of drinking this year – there would still be an extra 42,677 hospital admissions and 1,830 deaths over 20 years due to alcohol.

In a separate study, the Institute of Alcohol Studies (IAS) found that if drinking does not return to pre-pandemic levels, then by 2035 there will be 147,892 extra cases of nine alcohol-related diseases – such as liver cirrhosis and breast cancer – and 9,914 more premature deaths, costing the NHS £1.2billion. There are more than 200 health conditions linked to alcohol, including seven types of cancer.

The temporal tweak causes more problems — like internet outages — than benefits, they say. And dealing with leap seconds ultimately is futile, the group argues, since the Earth’s rotational speed hasn’t actually changed much historically.

Those classed as ‘increasing risk drinkers’ consume more than 14 units a week – the UK guidelines – but no more than 35 units per week for women and 50 for men. Meanwhile, high-risk drinkers consume even more than this.

Computers are really good at counting. But humans introduce irregularities like leap seconds that can throw a wrench in the works. One of the most infamous was the Y2K bug, when human-authored databases recorded only the last two digits of the year and messed up math when 1999 became 2000. A related problem is coming in 2038 when a 32-bit number that some computers use to count the seconds from Jan. 1, 1970, is no longer large enough.

Colin Angus, who led the University of Sheffield study, said: ‘The pandemic’s impact on our drinking behaviour is likely to cast a long shadow on our health and paint a worrying picture at a time when NHS services are already under huge pressure due to treatment backlogs.’

Since 1972, the world’s timekeeping authorities have added a leap second 27 times to the global clock known as the International Atomic Time (TAI). Instead of 23:59:59 changing to 0:0:0 at midnight, an extra 23:59:60 is tucked in. That causes a lot of indigestion for computers, which rely on a network of precise timekeeping servers to schedule events and to record the exact sequence of activities like adding data to a database.

In the worst-case scenario, this rose to 972,382 extra admissions and 25,192 deaths, costing the NHS £5.2billion. It is most likely that, in the next 20 years, 207,597 more people than usual will be hospitalised, and 7,153 will die, costing £1.1billion.

He said: ‘There’s a particular bump in women’s drinking at the point where they’re most likely to have been doing homeschooling during the initial lockdown.’ He said this ‘stressful’ burden may have driven some to drink more.

To ease the problems with computer clocks that don’t like 61-second minutes, Google pioneered the idea of the “leap smear” that makes the leap second’s changes in many tiny steps over the course of a day.

The tech giants and two key agencies agree that it’s time to ditch the leap second. Those are the US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and its French equivalent, the Bureau International de Poids et Mesures (BIPM).

The leap second change triggered a massive Reddit outage in 2012, as well as related problems at Mozilla, LinkedIn, Yelp and airline booking service Amadeus. In 2017, a leap second glitch at Cloudflare knocked a fraction of the network infrastructure company’s customers’ servers offline. Cloudflare’s software, comparing two clocks, calculated that time had gone backward but couldn’t properly handle that result.

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